Junkers 52 discovered in the sea bottom of Kea island, Greece

An important discovery came to light by a group of Greek amateur  divers, that of  a Junkers airplane, during an exploration mission from May 27th to June 2nd 2009 off the St. Niccolo Bay in Kea island, Cyclades, Greece.

This three engined Junkers 52 was a WW II German Luftwaffe transport aircraft, also affectionately known as “Tante Ju”, which has been resting intact since September 6th 1943 (i.e. for 66 year’s) at a depth of about -67 meters, in the clear blue Aegean waters.

Fore section of the Ju52 fuselage, with the port side engine and propeller visible.

Fore section of the Ju 52 fuselage, with the port side engine and propeller visible. (Copyright D. Galon and the Burdigala Project Team).

Ju 52 fully restored in Belgium. (Source: Joss

A Ju 52 fully restored preserved at the Brussels Air Museum in Belgium (ex OO-AGU). Copyright Radu Dobrescu - Ro Spotters.

The aircraft lays upright on sandy bottom with a south-west axis while the deepest point is at -68 meters; her condition is impeccable. There is no break at any point, nor missing of any part. She was powered by three BMW Type 132 (nine cylindered) engines of 660 HP each, propelling the 1930’s designed aeroplane to a maximum (quite slow) speed of 160 knots/290 kilometers per hour. Her autonomy was about 650 miles/1,200 km and could climb to a maximum flight altitude of about 20,600 Feet/6,300 meters. Her nasal (centrally positioned) engine is tilting downwards toward the seabed but still remains attached to the fuselage.

The central BMW Typ132 9-cylinder engine tilts downwards toward the sea bed. The pilots cockpit is frequented by fish. (KFB Collection).

The nasal BMW "Type 132" 9-cylinder engine tilts downwards toward the sea bed. The pilot's cockpit is frequented by an assortment of fish. (Copyright D. Galon and the Burdigala Project Team).

This version of Ju 52 (possibly a 3m/g7e model) with Werk Nr. 6590 belonging to S 1/TG 4, (Squadron 1/Transport Group 4, based in Kalamaki, i.e. the old Hellenikon airfield later Athens airport) was armored, carrying an MG 15,  7,92 mm caliber machine gun positioned at the upper part of the fuselage where also there is a big size cargo hatch opening, its lid fallen by the port side to the bottom. Probably the passengers escaped through this hatch after ditching the airplane into the sea, due to fuel starvation problems, as reported by a rescuing Dornier Do-24.

The MG-7 machine gun at the aft section of the fuselage, seated on a gyroscopic base; the small gunners windscreen is also evident.

The MG-15 machine gun at the aft section of the fuselage, seated on a gyroscopic base; the small gunner's windscreen is also evident. (Copyright D. Galon and the Burdigala Project Team).

The MG 15, a 7.92 mm machine gun, was the main weapon of the Junkers 52 of Kea (B-Stand). (KFB Collection).

In the cockpit, the starboard side steering column is visible between the pilot seat and flight instrument panel.

In the cockpit, the starboard side steering column is visible between the pilot seat and flight instrument panel. (Copyright D. Galon and the Burdigala Project Team).

View of the main cabin area of the aircraft. The cockpit entrance is visible and by its side the seat of the radio operator station.

View of the main cabin area of the aircraft. The cockpit entrance is visible and by its side the seat of the radio operator station. (Copyright D. Galon and the Burdigala Project Team).

A WW II Luftwaffe period Ju 52

A WW II Luftwaffe period Ju 52. (Source: http://www.ju52-3m.ch).

A Ju 52/3m flight from 1./KGr.zbV. 600 over the Mediterranean Sea, in 1943. (Source: Stofs Ju52/3m Page)

A Ju 52/3m flight from 1./KGr.zbV. 600 over the Mediterranean Sea, in 1943. (Source: Stof's Ju52/3m Page).

Ju 52 three-view drawing

Ju 52 three-view drawing. (Source http://www.aviastar.org/air/germany/ju-52.php).

Junkers Ju52-3m/g7e with roof cargo door & cannon. Looks same as the Kea Ju 52. (Source:http://www.junkers.de.vu).

Junkers Ju52-3m/g7e with roof cargo door & cannon. Looks same as the Kea Ju 52. (Source: http://www.junkers.de.vu).

The instrument panel of the cockpit.

The instrument panel of the cockpit. (Copyright D. Galon and the Burdigala Project Team).

Restored Ju52 cockpit (Copyright: Andreas Mueller - Spotterteam Graz)

A restored cockpit of Ju-52. Image copyright by Andreas Mueller - Spotterteam Graz.

It is interesting to note that in February 2009 the 150 years anniversary from the birth of Prof. Hugo Junkers, was celebrated. He was designer, inventor and founder of the Junkers Flugzeug-und Motorenwerke, AG, which was a major German aircraft manufacturer. The company produced some of the world’s most innovative and best-known airplanes over the course of its fifty-plus year history in Dessau, Germany. It was founded there in 1895 by Hugo Junkers, initially manufacturing boilers and radiators. After World War I the company switched to manufacturing airplanes. During World War II the company produced some of the most successful Luftwaffe planes, as well as piston and jet aircraft engines, albeit in the absence of its founder, who by then had been removed by the Nazis.

For further readings on the Junkers aircrafts and the famous  Ju 52 three engined multi purpose aircraft model, click this Link’s assortment page: http://hugojunkers.pytalhost.com/ju_tenth_a41.htm

A 1930s collage of Junkers Co. advertising, showing the companys diverse interests. (Source: www.junkers.de).

A 1930's collage of Junkers Co. advertising, showing the company's diverse manufacturing interests. (Source: http://www.junkers.de).

See also a short video from the discovering dive expedition of late May 2009:

For a full account  of the dive mission in the form of a daily log including more photographs, click here: www.keadive.gr
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One comment on “Junkers 52 discovered in the sea bottom of Kea island, Greece

  1. Pingback: My Blog: 2010 in review « Byron Riginos Weblog

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